Reading

Curiosity and the willingness to learn from others should never leave us. Below you will find a list of Recommended Reading (in alphabetical order by Title) that will serve to satisfy these human desires:

  • Act of Congress. By Robert G. Kaiser. A revealing and disturbing account of how hard it has become to get any major legislation through Congress.
  • Average is Over. By Tyler Cowen. About the disappearing middle class in America. Cowen explains why average is simply not good enough in this day and age.
  • Being Mortal. By Atul Gawande. From inside the medical establishment, Gawande, a practicing surgeon, reveals how unprepared America’s medical professionals are to deal with end of life issues in a way that is respectful of the convictions and wishes of patients who near the end of the road.
  • Coming Apart. By Charles Murray. A brilliant but discouraging analysis of the development of two completely separate classes of citizenry within the Caucasian segment of the US population.
  • Duty. By Robert M. Gates. One of the best written and most informative memoir by an exemplary public servant.
  • Grow. By Jim Stengel. How Ideals power growth and profit at the world’s greatest companies.
  • Global Crossings. By Alvaro Vargas Llosa. An eloquent explanation of why continuing immigration is of vital interest to the United States.
  • Hillbilly Elegy. By J.D. Vance. If you ever want to get a plausible explanation of Donald Trump’s appeal to the poor and undereducated white Americans, this is a book you should not miss. J.D. Vance escaped but he was one of them.
  • Knocking on Heaven’s Door. By Katy Butler. An achingly beautiful commentary on the failure of modern medicine to accept dying as an inevitable conclusion of human life and restore the value of a “good death”.
  • Our Kids. By Robert D. Putnam. This book addresses the widening class-based opportunity gap among young people based on a comparison of upward mobility challenges in his Ohio birth place in Port Clinton, fifty years ago and today. A convincing document evidencing that America has a serious class-based opportunity challenge.
  • Still Alice. By Lisa Genova. Probably the most compelling book I’ve read in a long time. About a Harvard professor who gradually gets hijacked by Alzheimer’s, ultimately depriving her of the right to choose her own destiny. It’s fictional but real. And really frightening.
  • Superpower. By Ian Bremmer. The book outlines three choices for America’s role in the world. The author, after thoughtful analysis, opts for a role that prioritizes the building of internal strength and making America a role model for the rest of the world. This choice implies acceptance of minimal US intervention in the solving of other nation’s problems.
  • The Big Thirst. By Charles Fishman. An up to date account of the importance of water in our lives and the logistical, political and social challenges presented by the unequal distribution of clean fresh water on our planet.
  • The Road to Character. By David Brooks. By studying the lives of a number of exemplary human beings as diverse as Dwight Eisenhower and Dorothy Day, David Brooks is looking for the deeper values that should inform and guide our lives. Brooks is on his own quest for what it takes to give life more meaning and hopes that it may provide a roadmap for his readers.
  • The Rule of Nobody. By Philip K. Howard. The Chairman of Common Cause offers in this book a startlingly fresh slant on what is holding back good, common sense, public governance in America.
  • The Unwinding. By George Packer. A piercing, factual and non-ideological critique of the growing inequality that is threatening to tear America apart.
  • Thinking Fast and Slow. By Daniel Kahneman. About fast, intuitive and emotional thinking versus slower, more deliberative and more logical thinking.
  • Tribe. By Sebastian Junger. Our yearning for belonging to a tribe explains both the legendary loyalty and solidarity of military units under fire and the difficulty of reintegration with society after the soldier comes home.
  • White House Burning. By Simon Johnson and James Kwak. About the Founding Fathers, our National Debt and why it matters to you.
  • Working at Cross Purposes. By Mike Marks, Tim Horan and Mike Emerson. How Distributors and Manufacturers can manage conflict successfully.